A Meteoric Shower.

The Sandborn Enterprise in a former issue made mention of "mud balls" which fell with hail during the storm on the night of July 6th. The Enterprises says it was erroneously informed as to the substance of which three remarkable globules are composed, the coating of soil taken on when they struck the ground evidently misleading our informant. Our friend, Emil Djuberg, has kindly presented to us a handful of these stones, evidently of meteoric origin. They range in size from a small pea to an inch in diameter, and in appearance resemble iron bullets, only that they have an irregular surface bery much like that of a sycamore ball. Our theory is that an aerolite or meteoric stone in a semi-molten state was precipitated into the storm cloud and at the moment of contact an explosion occurred, scattering the aerolite into fragments, which being instantly cooled, gave them the spherical form as of molten iron dropped into water. So far as we have been able to definitely trace it the phenomenon is confined to one section, or more accurately, to a quarter section of land, although rumor has it that other places in the storm's path received a shower of this novel "hail." On the farm of Alfred Andserson the morning after the storm the ground was covered with these extraordinary and mysterious arrivals from space, the lighter ones lying on the surface, the heavier ones imbedded an inch or two in the plowed g5round, the holes plainly indicating where they were to be found, a dozen or more in a space of a foot square. On breaking one open a small, hard centre is found to be the nucleus upon which the outer portion has been deposited or formed, the whole, in substance and weight, resembling iron-ore. Verily, it was a strange freak of nature.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 7/31/1890

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Jim Keegan, a local character, was arrested upon complaint of J. H. Tompkins, charged with resorting to a room over the postoffice with a young girl for immoral purposes.

Ward County Independent, 6/8/1911

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Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Strong, of Black, reached Villard, last evening in search of their son Al, a boy about sixteen years of age, who left home suddenly and mysteriously yesterday. For the past few weeks the boy had been working at Minot for Waldref Bros., in the brick yard. He was at minot during the stay of Taylor's "praying band," and was a constant visitor at the camp meeting, during which, it seems, that Mr. Taylor obtained an undue influence over the boy, and completely "turned his head," by the constant exhortations for him to join the army of "solid Multoons," and inviting him to attend the proposed great camp meeting in Jamestown, for which place it is supposed the boy has struck out. Mr. and Mrs. Strong are extremely lenient and kind to their children, and Al has never had the least greivance to complain of. His visits at the camp meeting simply inspired him with develish {sp} notions instead of Christian love, and boy-like he allowed the worst impulses to control him. If Bro. Taylor's religious teaching has this influence over the youth of the country we would advise him to resign the ministry and engage in some honorable pursuit.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 7/14/1887


The action of malicious individuals who carved the ropes and cut a hole in Rev. B. S. Taylor's tent last week caused the greatest indignation among our citizens, and relief, so far as damage is concerned, was forthcoming. This is the meanest and most contemptible outrage possible for any set of cowardly curs to commit, and it would be no surprise to us and simply and act of justice, if the guilty parties, when discovered, are strung up to a telegraph pole to die the death of the dogs they are.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 7/14/1887

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Abe Kilbury, an aged Velva farmer, while helping Andrew Wold with a gas tractor, fell in front of the plows and was dragged for a distance. His right leg was badly cut, his hip dislocated and he was painfully bruised. His escape from death was miraculous.

Ward County Independent, 6/12/1913

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Aneta Panorama: Peter G. Thompson, living one and a half miles north of Lee, dropped dead Tuesday afternoon while helping one of his neighbors unhitch a team of horses. We have not learned the cause of his death, but it was probably heart failure. He leaves a wife and large family.

Bismarck Tribune, 7/16/1900

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Stabbing Affray.

Moorhead, Minn., July 20.— At 9 o'clock this morning a Swede named Carl Eklund stabbed a Norwegian named Ole Jacobson with a pocket knife, cutting him the mouth and again in the left breast just above the nipple. The stabbing took place in the town of Alliance, twenty miles south of Moorhead, on a farm. The two men are farm laborers and were plowing. Eklund, who is represented to be a small man, was in the lead and stopped to repair his plow. Jacobson came along and drove right onto Eklund's plow. Eklund became enraged and kicked one of the horses of Jacobson's team, when it is stated Jacobson struck Eklund in the face with his fist, whereupon Eklund said if Jacobson should strike him again he would cut him with a knife he was using in cutting leather to mend the plow. It is assumed Jacobson did strike him again when Eklund struck twice with the knife. The gash in the breast is two inches deep and penetrated the lung. The wounded man rode in a buggy all the way to Moorhead arriving before 1 p.m. covered with his blood. He was taken to the hospital, his wounds dressed and his ante-mortem statement taken by the coroner as the attending physicians have doubts of his recovery.

Bismarck Tribune, 7/21/1885

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Corporal Francis, of Company B, Twelfth infantry, U.S.A., while bathing in the Missouri river, at the mouth of Bad river, near Pierre, got beyond his depth and drowned before the eyes of his brother soldiers. The troops have been dragging the river for his body but in vain. It is an old saying that "the Missouri never gives up its dead."

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 7/31/1890

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BORCHARDT IS DEAD; 'JUSTIFIABLE HOMICIDE'


Witnesses Testify to Dangerous Character of Slain Anamoose Man

Anamoose, N.D., June 2.—Charles Borchardt, shot last Tuesday by Henry Panke, when the former attempted to enter the latter's farm home near here, died Friday. The coroner's jury today returned a verdict of justifiable homicide.

Half a dozen witnesses testified that Borchardt was a dangerous character.

Last spring, according to the witnesses, 18 citizens of the neighborhood drew up a proclamation, demanding that Borchardt leave that part of the country, because of his unwelcome attentions to Mrs. Panke. He had been gone some months, when he returned Tuesday, attempted to force his way into Panko's home, and was shot.

Bismarck Tribune, 6/2/1917

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Hans Olson, a motorist demonstrated the well known fact that two bodies cannot occupy the same space at the same time, when he attempted to displace a team of horses. He was pitched from his machine beneath the horses and trampled until he was unconscious.

Ward County Independent, 6/8/1911

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